X-Ray Spectroscopy with Superconducting Spectrometers at SSRL and LCLS-II

Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 3:00pm

Speaker: Kent Irwin, Stanford

Program Description

Superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) x-ray spectrometers provide intermediate energy resolution with much greater efficiency than gratings, opening new scientific opportunities including low concentration active site measurements in biology, surface chemistry, and the study of dilute dopants. I will describe the state of the art and the development path for arrays of TES spectrometers. This spring, we commissioned a soft x-ray TES spectrometer array at SSRL BL10-1, and used it for XAS and RIXS of samples including model iron compounds and frozen hemoglobin. I also describe the development of TES arrays with 10 kHz frame rates for the LCLS-II SXR beamline.

Bio

Kent D. Irwin earned his B.S. from Caltech in 1989, and MS and PhD. From Stanford University in 1995. He was a NIST Fellow and the leader of the Quantum Sensors Group at the NIST Laboratories in Boulder, Colorado until moving back to the Bay Area in 2013. He is now a Professor of Physics at Stanford University, and a Professor of Photon Science and of Particle Physics and Astrophysics at SLAC, and Chief Scientist of the Advanced Instruments for Research Division in SLAC's Technology Innovations Directorate.

X-Ray Spectroscopy with Superconducting Spectrometers at SSRL and LCLS-II
Find Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource on FlickrFind Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource on YouTubeFind Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource on Twitter