Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Ligand Isomerization of Metal Complexes Studied With Transient X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

Wednesday, November 28, 2012 - 3:00pm

Matthew Strader, LBNL

The chemistry of transition metal complexes in solution has broad applicability to a number of fields, including catalysis, charge carrier generation and biological systems.  Pump-probe spectroscopy has long enjoyed success in identifying ultrafast reaction mechanisms and intermediate states involved in transition metal complex photochemistry.  The incorporation of ultrafast, x-ray, probe pulses from modern light sources has enabled the characterization of metal complex chemistry using x-ray absorption spectroscopy.  Metal K-edge XANES yields information on the valency of intermediate metal center, while L-edge XANES provides complementary information on the electronic occupancy and hybridization of the metal d-orbitals on the picosecond timescale.  Transient EXAFS can be used to precisely identify the molecular geometry of the ligand cage.  Specifically, I will present my research using Beamline 6.0.1/6.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source to indentify key intermediate states in charge transfer reactions (iron and ruthenium bipyridyls) and ligand isomerization reactions (cobalt nitrosyl) upon visible photoexcitation.

Ultrafast Charge Transfer and Ligand Isomerization of Metal Complexes Studied With Transient X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy
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